For information about radiation exposure and medical imaging click here.

An x-ray is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. The ability of x-rays to penetrate tissues and bones varies according to the tissue's composition and density. Peninsula Imaging uses advanced digital technology to produce its x-rays. Images are permanently electronically stored and may be easily retrieved and printed on film or viewed on a computer by the radiologist for interpretation.

Digital x-ray has certain advantages over conventional film x-ray, including the ability for the x-ray technologist to immediately tell if the image is acceptable. Additionally, the radiologist can electronically manipulate the image for improved detail and accuracy of interpretation. Digital x-ray is also faster, provides enhanced image quality and since images are securely stored electronically on a computer, your important health information is readily available and safe - no more lost, damaged or misplaced x-ray films.

 


Help Center

When would I need an X-ray?
How should I prepare for an X-ray?
What can I expect during the procedure?
What will I experience during an X-ray?
When and how will I find out the results of my X-ray?
Are there any health risks from having an X-ray?


When would I need an X-ray?

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Some common reasons your physician may order an x-ray are:
  • Evaluate trauma and fractures (dislocations/broken bones)
  • Evaluate arthritis
  • Demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments following a treatment of a fracture
  • Diagnose pneumonia or lung cancer
  • Evaluate skeletal system for tumors, metastatic disease or systemic disorders
  • Identify a cause of acute abdominal or chest pain
  • Identify foreign bodies
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How should I prepare for an X-ray?

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There is no special preparation required for most bone x-rays. You may be asked to change into a gown before your examination and remove jewelry, eyeglasses and any metal objects during the exam. Always inform the technologist if there is any possibility that you may be pregnant.

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What can I expect during the procedure?

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An x-ray exam may take anywhere from 5 to a half hour depending on your study.
  • You may be positioned standing or sitting or perhaps lying down on an x-ray table depending on exactly the type of exam or the body part being imaged.
  • Cushions or supports may be used to help you hold the proper position
  • The technologist will step behind a radiation barrier and ask you to hold very still and may ask you to hold your breath for a few seconds.
  • The x-ray equipment is activated and the x-rays penetrate the body part and are detected after they exit a special detector device.
  • The technologist may then reposition you for another view and the process is repeated as necessary.
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What will I experience during an X-ray?

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X-ray imaging is painless. Some discomfort may result from lying on the table - a hard surface that may feel cold. To get a clear image of an injury such as a possible fracture, you may be asked to hold an uncomfortable position for a short period of time. Any movement could blur the image and make it necessary to repeat the procedure.

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When and how will I find out the results of my X-ray?

One of our on-site staff of highly trained radiologists will study your images and provide your physician with a written report which will include a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, as well as a recommendation for further studies if needed.

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Are there any health risks from having an X-ray?

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It is generally agreed witin the medical community that the small theoretical risks associated with the use of radiation are greatly outweighed by the important diagnostic information x-rays provide. Our state-of-the-art equipment utilizes the lowest dose of radiation necessary while providing fast high quality images. Additionally, our system has tightly controlled x-ray beams with significant filtration and dose control methods to minimize stray or scatter radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure.

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